White Soda Bread 10


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White Soda Bread
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Votes: 2
Rating: 4
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Servings
1 Loaf
Cook Time
50 Minutes
Servings
1 Loaf
Cook Time
50 Minutes
White Soda Bread
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 2
Rating: 4
You:
Rate this recipe!
Servings
1 Loaf
Cook Time
50 Minutes
Servings
1 Loaf
Cook Time
50 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: Loaf
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 450 °F
  2. Sift all the dry ingredients together into a large bowl. Mix well by lifting the dry ingredients up into your hands and then letting them fall back into the bowl through your fingers. This adds more air and therefore hopefully more lightness to your finished bread. Lightly whisk the egg and buttermilk together. Make a well in the center and pour in most of the egg and buttermilk at once. Using one hand, with your fingers stiff and outstretched (like a claw!), stir in a full circular movement from the center to the outside of the bowl in ever increasing circles, adding a little more buttermilk if necessary. The dough should be softish, not too wet and sticky.
  3. The trick with white soda bread is not to over-mix the dough. Mix it as quickly and as gently as possible, thus keeping it light and airy. When the dough all comes together, turn it out onto a rice-floured work surface.
  4. Wash and dry your hands. With rice floured fingers, roll lightly for a few seconds—just enough to tidy it up. Pat the dough into a round, pressing it to about 2 in height. Place the dough on a baking sheet dusted lightly with rice flour. With a sharp knife cut a deep cross in it, letting the cuts go over the sides of the bread. Prick with a knife at four angles which, according to Irish folklore, is to let the fairies out!
  5. Bake in the oven for 5 minutes, then reduce the temperature to 350 °F for a further 25-30 minutes or until cooked. If in doubt, tap the bottom of the bread: if it is cooked, it will sound hollow. Cool on a wire rack.
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10 thoughts on “White Soda Bread

    • Reply
      TBGFR-Author Post author

      Hi Stacey,

      I haven’t actually tried this recipe in my bread maker yet. I have only made it in my oven. I would love to hear the results if you are willing to try it and share!

      Thanks for the comment.

      Conrad

  • Reply
    Carolyn

    What could one use instead of dried milk powder? And of course the buttermilk :) I can’t have dairy as well as the gluten.

    • Reply
      TBGFR-Author Post author

      Hi Carolyn,

      You could try Soy Milk Powder as a substitute for the milk powder: Now Foods Instant Soy Milk Powder, 20-Ounce

      As for the buttermilk substitute you could try this:

      1 1/3 cup Soy Milk

      1 1/4 Tbs Lemon Juice

      Mix and let stand a few minutes before using. This should give a similar consistency and the sharpness the buttermilk would normally provide.

      Happy baking!

  • Reply
    Morag Lennie

    Hi, could you possibly translate your recipes into measurements/ terminology which are used 8in the UK. How many ounces is a cup? Ang what is Baking Soda?

    • Reply
      Patricia

      Hi Morag,
      Baking soda is known as “bicarb” or bicarbonate of soda in the UK (not to be confused with baking powder).
      A cup could have different weights depending on the ingredient – an extreme example would be a cup of feathers compared to a cup lead (not that you’d cook with either of course:)
      So if you want to use a recipe with cup measurements you need to remember that these are NOT weight measurements. A cup is about 250mls or half a pint. You can use a teacup or coffee mug to measure out the dry ingredients.
      Also bear in mind that an American tablespoon is the size of a British dessertspoon. If you use a UK tablespoon you will definitely have too much of the ingredient measured with it.
      I hope this helps when you’re trying to figure out American recipes.

      • Reply
        Conrad Dekker Post author

        Thank you Patricia for taking the time to explain that for our friend Morag :)

        I really hope to get more of a community feel with the website and I appreciate your help! :)

  • Reply
    Debbie

    Hello, I made this loaf today (I am in Australia) and am disappointed it didn’t turn out as nice as yours looks! Yours looks crispy and brown whereas mine looks a bit anaemic. Should it have had an egg glaze perhaps??? Anyway it tasted OK, but not sure I would make it again. I am wondering if I didn’t cook it long enough.

    • Reply
      Conrad Dekker Post author

      Hi Debbie,

      Thank you for the comment on the recipe. I appreciate the criticism and always hope to make each recipe better!

      The ‘trick’ with gluten free baking, or with any baking for that matter, is practice with each recipe. It may sound a little cliche, but every oven and every person works a little differently and I can’t promise it will work out the first time every time.

      One of the biggest steps worth considering that might help is to make sure the oven is properly heated (it’s easy to rush putting the loaf in when you can’t wait to try it!)

      You can also try and lightly brush the dough with a mixture of buttermilk and egg to help make the crust a little more crispy!

      I really hope this helps and you try it again, because I really love this bread recipe! :)